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ANCIENT AFRICA AND EARLY ROME

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BLACK MAN IN EARLY ROME

This article is written by Dr. Runoko Rashidi, learn more about him, and his articles at drrunoko.com

Ancient African people, sometimes called Moors, are known to have had a significant presence and influence in early Rome.  African soldiers, specifically identified as Moors, were actively recruited for Roman military service and were stationed in Britain, France, Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, Poland and Romania.  Many of these Africans rose to high rank.  Lusius Quietus, for example, was one of Rome’s greatest generals and was named by Roman Emperor Trajan as his successor.  He is described as a “man of Moorish race and considered the ablest soldier in the Roman army.”

For most of the second century Africans dominated the intellectual life of Rome.  By the end of the second century nearly a third of the Roman senate was of African origin. St. Victor I became the first African bishop of Rome in 189 C.E. and reigned until 199 C.E.  Victor I, the first pope known to have had dealings with the imperial household, is described as “the most forceful of the 2nd-century popes.”

Read more: https://afrorealitytruth.blogspot.com/2020/11/ancient-africa-and-early-rome.html?fbclid=IwAR30W6KXt-bW7sfRRu-z6BjUJc1Xsu2NAdbIEO6KzM_YOLLUCVaUoR-e5n4